What to do when you get sued… (revisited)

Rather than re-write my post What happens when you get sued for your inaccessible website, I wanted to revisit the topic entirely. A few years ago, I wrote a series of blog posts about the “Accessibility Business Case” Ultimately, I determined that reduction of legal risk was the most powerful business case argument. Recent events […]

The business case for issue prevention: Extreme Accessibility

I originally posted this on LinkedIn. It turns out that LinkedIn is a poor place for me to reach my audience, as my average post gets 10x as many views as this post first got on LinkedIn. There have long been discussions on the accessibility industry surrounding the business case for accessibility. The Education and […]

On Overlays as a means of resolving website accessibility issues

Recently an article has been making the rounds: Should Accessibility Overlay Tools Be Used as a Strategic Part of your Accessibility Efforts. Some have asked me what my thoughts are on this topic and I feel compelled to share a few comments, because the article discusses a handful of emerging approaches. I’ve already shared my […]

Tenon.io December webinar is now online

If you are interested in learning about the next generation in Web Accessibility Testing, give Tenon.io a try. If you or your organization need help with accessibility consulting, strategy, or accessible web development,¬†email me directly at karl@karlgroves.com or call me at +1 443-875-7343. Download Resume [MS Word] Full Transcript> Karl Groves: …We’re live. All right. […]

Effectively including accessibility into web developer training

In October, energized by having just attended Accessibility Camp Toronto I quickly threw together a post titled Your computer school sucks. Looking back at a handful of my previous posts, they reminds me a bit of reading Nietzsche – not in terms of content, but in terms of consisting of a lot of criticism and […]

When the treatment is worse than the disease

I’ve previously discussed the pitfalls and false claims of all those per-site accessibility tools that claim to make your site more accessible. To be blunt, I think the vendors of such products are criminals for selling products that are proven to have little to no benefit. Their customers are duped into believing that the product […]

Your computer school sucks

Sitting at my gate returning home from Accessibility Camp Toronto and remembering some of the great conversations I had. The Friday before camp, Billy Gregory and I did a presentation on accessibility at Hacker You, a company that provides web developer training in Toronto. Billy actually does these sort of lunch and learn sessions at […]

Sue Everyone

I hate this post. I hate the title of it. I hate what it implies. Even more, I hate how right it is. This will be the 124th posting on this blog. Although my posts and social media postings are rather strongly worded, I think I’ve also been clear that I don’t like selling accessibility […]

What happens when you get sued for your inaccessible website

In the United States, the primary motivator for paying attention to accessibility seems to be risk avoidance. While I’d personally rather see people work to make their ICT systems more accessible because they believe in Universal Usability, litigation (or threats thereof) is what truly gets the discussion (and budget) moving for accessibility. Some argue that […]

On Certification

At CSUN 2012, the ATIA, Microsoft, and other companies laid forth a proposal plan to create a professional organization around the Accessibility profession. Among the topics of discussion on that day was certification. The next day I posed the question on this blog What does it take to call yourself an accessibility expert?. Cyndi Rowland […]