Measuring the harm of flawed academic papers

For several years I’ve been interested in finding and reading academic work in the field of web accessibility. I have a very strong belief that the things we say regarding web accessibility must be based on a significant amount of rigor and I hold in higher esteem those who base their statements on fact rather than […]

WTF-ARIA?!?

Recently, I saw someone Tweet that “…ARIA should be last” when working to make a website accessible. As you learn in Logic 101, generalized statements are particularly false. Such a broad statement, though mostly correct at least in spirit, is wholly incorrect in certain situations. ARIA is clearly the right choice in cases where native […]

The little button that could

The original issue A link is used to perform the action of a button. The code below is used to show a region of the page which is hidden by default. Screen readers will read this code as a link and expect that it will navigate. Instead, upon activating this link, focus remains on the […]

Open Accessibility Testing needs YOU

Several weeks before CSUN 2014, John Foliot approached myself and others about a Hackathon at CSUN. The idea was a grand one: ARIA is here (cue the cheering), but working devs still need to deal with backward compatibility – what works where, and what doesn’t work where? I’m sure a number of you have started […]

Everything you know about accessibility testing is wrong (Part 4)

…how many bigger issues have we missed wasting our time fixing this kind of crap? @thebillygregory Literally every single audit report I’ve ever done includes issues relating to the following: Missing alt attributes for images Missing explicit relationships between form fields and their labels Tables without headers or without explicit relationships between header cells and […]

Looking forward to CSUN 2014

I’m currently wrapping up the rest of my work for the week and getting ready for the annual pilgrimage to San Diego for the annual International Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference, otherwise known as “CSUN”. Unlike previous years, I have relatively few presentations. I’m glad about that, really, because it means I can spend […]

Everything you know about accessibility is wrong (Part 3)

In the previous post in this series, I ended with a discussion that “current automatic accessibility testing practices take place at the wrong place and wrong time and is done by the wrong people” but really this applies to all accessibility testing. Of course every organization is different, but my experience substantiates the statement quite […]

Woodshop tour

I posted this to Facebook but wanted to share on my site, too. This is where I spend my weekends when it is cold outside: Note: alt attribute on each image is blank. Visible text under the image describes the image. Looking into the entrance-way. Drill press and lathe straight ahead. Chalkboard paint along the […]

“Should we detect screen readers?” is the wrong question

The recent release of WebAIM’s 5th Screen Reader User Survey has heated up a recently simmering debate regarding whether or not it should be possible to detect screen readers. Currently there are no reliable means of determining whether a user with disabilities is visiting your site and, specific to screen readers, this is because that […]

Everything you know about accessibility testing is wrong (part 2)

In Everything you know about accessibility testing is wrong (part 1) I left off talking about automated accessibility testing tools. It is my feeling that a tool of any kind absolutely must deliver on its promise to make the user more effective at the task they need the tool to perform. As a woodworker, I […]